Senior Researchers

Professor Geoffrey M. SpinksGeoff Spinks 250 250

Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow

Qualifications

B. Applied Science (1st class), University of Melbourne, Australia 
PhD, University of Melbourne, Australia

Research Interests

  • Electromechanical actuators (“artificial muscles”) using inherently conducting polymers and / or carbon nanotubes.
  • Sensors for mechanical systems.
  • Development of various applications for actuating polymers including for the cochlear implant; an electronic Braille screen; a robotic fish for environmental sensing; and a 'massage sleeve'. 

Geoff has always been fascinated by science and chemistry in particular and completed a Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry) at the University of Melbourne in 1986. He also completed his PhD in Melbourne and then began his academic career as a Lecturer in Materials Engineering at the University of Wollongong. Shortly thereafter he began working with Professor Gordon Wallace in the Intelligent Polymer Research Institute.

Under the ACES umbrella, Geoff’s main interest is the development of artificial muscle to help position the advanced cochlea implant. Geoff and his bionics team are also looking at improved actuator materials with the aim of generating a bionic muscle – an artificial muscle that can match the performance of natural skeletal muscle. Using conducting polymers, hydrogels, carbon nanotubes and graphene, the team works to build better artificial muscles.

Recently, the team and collaborators discovered the novel torsional type actuation in carbon nanotube twisted yarns. Geoff’s team are currently studying both fundamental aspects of artificial muscles and developing applications for the cochlea implant and a wearable massage sleeve.

A very busy ACES staff member, Geoff currently supervises four PhD students, regularly authors papers and often is asked to represent ACES publicly. 

Something you wouldn’t know about Geoff? He has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do!

Contact Professor Spinks

 

Last reviewed: 11 July, 2014